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Carol B. Thompson and Bud Day papers on Southern Africa

 Collection
Identifier: MSS 329 large

Scope and Contents

The Carol Thompson and Bud Day papers document the struggle for the liberation of Southern Africa. A significant portion of the collection is background materials used for researching and organizing the liberation support network across the US and the world. The files also demonstrate some of the tactics used, including picketing, demonstrating, speaking, boycotting, and appearing on the media. The collection includes material on the Southern Africa Support Coalition (SASC), founded in the early 1970s by people associated with the Black Panthers, especially Michael Zinzun. SASC was one of the organizations that SARP worked with and supplied information to. The archives includes material on campaigns, many involving SASC including against Del Monte for fishing in Namibia waters, the attempt of South Africa to open a consulate in Los Angeles, and the Krugerrand. There were also campaigns in sport of the sports and cultural boycott including South African participation in the Davis Cup tennis tournament in Newport Beach and U.S. artists performing in South Africa.

Dates

  • approximately 1970-1999

Conditions Governing Access

The collection is open for research.

Conditions Governing Access

The material is stored offsite in Remote Storage. Please contact Special Collections 3 working days in advance if you wish to use it.

Conditions Governing Use

Copyright is retained by the author of the items in this collection, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Biographical / Historical

Description from African Activist Archive (africanactivist.msu.edu) website: "The archive of Carol Thompson and Warren "Bud" Day reflects their activities in support of Southern Africa liberation in the United States and Africa. Their solidarity activity which began when Day, campus minister at Michigan State University (MSU), and Thompson, a political science doctoral candidate at MSU, founded the Southern Africa Liberation Committee (SALC) in 1972. They were involved in the founding of the Concerned Americans in Southern Africa (CASA) when they lived in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania from late 1977 to mid-1980. This involvement with CASA continued when they lived in Harare, Zimbabwe in 1985-1986 and in 1992-1993 plus four other time in shorter periods ranging from two to six months. During their time in Zimbabwe, Carol was based at the University of Zimbabwe and her research and writing addressed the whole Southern African region (Southern Africa Development Community). Bud worked in water and sanitation and was country director of Oxfam America (1985-1986) and of International Voluntary Services (1992-1993) while in Harare. Bud Day was Peace Education Secretary, American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) in Chicago (1976-1977) and in Pasadena, CA (1977-1978). After moving to Los Angeles in 1981 they founded the Southern Africa Research Project (SARP) in response to the need for dissemination of materials about Southern Africa in Southern California. SARP's focus was on providing resources and thus it only staged events in coalition with other anti-apartheid organizations in Los Angeles. (Source: Carol Thompson) The Southern Africa Support Coalition was, by far, the most consistent and enduring liberation support group in Los Angeles, founded in the early 1970s, by Black Panthers, especially Michael Zinzun. SASC always exemplified the best of the Panthers – class analysis, non-racialism, militant organizing, and linking marginalized in Los Angeles to those in the liberation struggle. Long before Rodney King, SASC linked police brutality by the LAPD to apartheid police brutality. SASC linked the infant mortality of African-Americans in Los Angeles to the infant mortality rate of Africans in Rhodesia, the Portuguese colonies, SW Africa and under apartheid. Athletes and Artists against Apartheid SASC was the key link between the Hollywood celebrities and the LA community. Many pickets were staged against artists who played in Sun City. Others, like Harry Belafonte, would meet with SASC leaders. Tennis – Davis Cup This event brought together a major coalition of groups but SASC was again in the leadership. The two who poured oil on the tennis court to delay the match were SASC members. Child Survival With contacts that Bud Day, Carol Thompson and Dr. Gus Gill had in Zimbabwe, SASC initiated a project to raise funds equally for children at Drew Medical Center, Los Angeles and for Sally Mugabe’s child survival program. Several thousand dollars were raised – and equally shared – to link the issues in LA to Zimbabwe. It is also an example of how “concerned Americans” in Zimbabwe facilitated the links. LA to Namibia SASC sent two members to the independence of Namibia by raising funds to purchase their tickets and making contacts with SWAPO. Representative Mervyn Dymally and the West Coast Link When Dymally became Chair, Subcommittee for Africa, House Committee on Foreign Affairs, he asked the Washington Office on Africa for contacts to help him establish a “west coast link” in his district to disseminate information about legislative actions on Africa. WOA contacted Friends of the ANC and Frontline States. They knew about his previous mixed record of strong support for sanctions but also setting up lucrative business deals in various parts of Africa but were willing to try a “link.” But it did not go anywhere, as Dymally’s role in the alleged theft of diamonds became more public. Collective memory is not positive, but we think he was indicted over the issues. Friends of the ANC and Frontline States - 1990 As Mandela was released from prison and South Africa was moving to elections, SASC disbanded and merged into this new group.

Extent

2.8 Linear Feet (4 boxes)

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Papers donated by Carol B. Thompson.

Related Materials

Part of the African Activist Archive.

Table of Contents

Box I. 1. University of Southern California -- 2. UCLA ; Committee for Health in Southern Africa (CHISA) -- 3. Southern Africa Resource Project: Los Angeles (1981-1991) -- 4. Examples of Literature Sold/Distributed: S.N.A.F. Resource Project Los Angeles -- 5. Southern Africa Support Coalition -- 6. Apartheid propaganda -- 7. Sports boycotts (Davis Cup tennis 1977, rugby 1981, 1984 Olympics, Artists against Apartheid Los Angeles) -- 8. Churches, Southern California -- 9. [Miscellaneous (includes: ANC Southern California Chapter; Destabilization; LA activities; California) -- 10. Rhodesia to Zimbabwe: A Chronology 1830 to 1976 / by George M. Houser -- 11. Zimbabwe: A background paper / prepared by Rev. W. Minter -- Box II -- 1. [Financial sanctions]: Krugerrands; Bank Campaign California; Stop Banking on Apartheid, 1970s -- 2. Divestment, California -- 3. Divestment, General -- 4. Oil/Energy Fluor Corporation, Lost Contracts -- 5. Coalition for the Liberation of Southern Africa 1976-77 -- 6. Peace Tour 1987 -- 7. The Africa Peace Tour; April 28-May 19, 1986 -- 8. Southern Africa Educational Campaign; 1994 A New Vision (Post-Apartheid) -- 9. Concerned Americans (Dar es Salaam, Harare) -- 10. Resource Materials (corporations, sanctions) -- 11. Mercenaries -- 12. East Lansing (Lovemore Nyoni; SALC; J.P. McGoff/Panax) -- 13. Bud Day/AFSC 1976-78 Chicago -- 14. Zimbabwe Independence -- Box III. 1. Mandela USA Tour 1990 -- 2. Assorted liberation movement publications (ANC, SWAPO, Frelimo) -- 3. Kits and conference packs.

Donor’s Description

These files represent lives in the struggle for the liberation of Southern Africa, rather than an institutional history. Therefore, they are more disparate and less consistent than an institutional record. What they do represent is that no matter where we lived, we were organizing for Southern African liberation, among other activist struggles (e.g., Central America in the 1980s in Los Angeles).

The places of organizing reflect where we were living, giving two major divisions: 1) Los Angeles a) Southern Africa Resource Project – founded by “BudnCarol” b) Southern African Support Coalition – the oldest and strongest liberation support group in Southern California, led by ex-Black Panthers c) UCLA – Bud taught there as an adjunct professor in Public Health d) USC – Carol was full-time in Political Science (1979-1994) 2) Concerned Americans in Southern Africa a) Dar es Salaam, Tanzania late 1977 to mid-1980 – over two years b) Harare, Zimbabwe – We moved back and forth between Zimbabwe and California because Carol would take leaves of absence without pay from USC. Times in Harare: 1984 – 6 months 1992 and 1993 – two full years 1985-86 – two full years 1994 – 5 months 1988 – 2-3 months 1989 - 3 months Carol’s research and writing addressed the whole Southern African region (Southern Africa Development Community) not just Zimbabwe, and she was based at the University of Zimbabwe. Bud worked in water and sanitation and was country director of Oxfam America (1985-86) and of International Voluntary Services (1992-93) while in Harare. Bud also was Peace Education Secretary, AFSC, in Chicago and the two met in East Lansing, forming SALC with others.

A major portion of the files are background materials used in organizing, rather than items about organizing. Selected from boxes full of materials, they demonstrate the amount of research the liberation support network did across the USA and the world. The materials were invaluable, priceless, to local organizing, for they helped us in our analysis, our ability to answer questions, to be clear about the goals. Debates raged on every issue. Definitely, central, important parts of organizing for change in policy are research and writing. Yet the collectives also must get out to picket, demonstrate, speak, boycott, appear on media, etc. etc. The majority of the files shows the different tactics used. Carol Thompson – 1 February 2008 Bud (Warren J.) Day – deceased December 2003

Donor’s Outline

1. SOUTHERN AFRICA SUPPORT COALITION EARLY 1970s to 1990

By far, the most consistent and enduring liberation support group in Los Angeles, founded in the early 1970s, by Black Panthers, especially Michael Zinzun. SASC always exemplified the best of the Panthers – class analysis, non-racialism, militant organizing, and linking marginalized in Los Angeles to those in the liberation struggle. Long before Rodney King, SASC linked police brutality by the LAPD to apartheid police brutality. SASC linked the infant mortality of African-Americans in Los Angeles to the infant mortality rate of Africans in Rhodesia, the Portuguese colonies, SW Africa and under apartheid. And much more….

South African Consulate in Beverly Hills, CA Organizing in San Francisco in the 1970s ousted the S African Consulate from that city. They tried to come to LA, but SASC mobilized the people to lobby the city council and they were not allowed. The consulate then moved to Beverly Hills, a separate municipality. Many demos and sit-ins occurred there (complete with vicious policy dogs) over decades.

Del Monte – fishing out Namibian waters SASC was the LA component of this California, not national campaign

Kruggerand SASC led this struggle in LA.

Athletes and Artists against Apartheid SASC was the key link between the Hollywood celebrities and the LA community. Many pickets were staged against artists who played in Sun City. Others, like Harry Belafonte, would meet with SASC leaders.

Tennis – Davis Cup This event brought together a major coalition of groups but SASC was again in the leadership. The two who poured oil on the tennis court to delay the match were SASC members.

Child Survival With contacts that Bud Day, Carol Thompson and Dr. Gus Gill had in Zimbabwe, SASC initiated a project to raise funds equally for children at Drew Medical Center, Los Angeles and for Sally Mugabe’s child survival program. Several thousand dollars were raised – and equally shared – to link the issues in LA to Zimbabwe. It is also an example of how “concerned Americans” in Zimbabwe facilitated the links.

LA to Namibia SASC sent two members to the independence of Namibia by raising funds to purchase their tickets and making contacts with SWAPO.

Representative Mervyn Dymally and the West Coast Link When Dymally became Chair, Subcommittee for Africa, House Committee on Foreign Affairs, he asked the Washington Office on Africa for contacts to help him establish a “west coast link” in his district to disseminate information about legislative actions on Africa. WOA contacted Friends of the ANC and Frontline States. They knew about his previous mixed record of strong support for sanctions but also setting up lucrative business deals in various parts of Africa, but were willing to try a “link.” But it did not go anywhere, as Dymally’s role in the alleged theft of diamonds became more public. Collective memory is not positive, but we think he was indicted over the issues.

Friends of the ANC and Frontline States - 1990 As Mandela was released from prison and South Africa was moving to elections, SASC disbanded and merged into this new group.

DEL MONTE – CALIFORNIA SASC 1976-78

Del Monte was a California-based corporation which had a very bad record concerning labor relations, pollution of waters from their canneries, and pollution of soil from their fruits. Workers are only hired seasonally and do not make a living wage. Del Monte fished out the California waters and moved to Hawaii – and then to Namibia. Namibians catching and canning the sardines could not afford to buy them.

This campaign is another example of linking local issues of corporate pollution and poor labor conditions in the USA to Southern Africa.

Several educational meetings were held. No major boycott took off.

ARTISTS AND ATHLETES AGAINST APARTHEID 1980s-1990

SASC worked closely with this group, often providing the picket lines outside events of those who broke the cultural boycott.

DAVIS CUP TENNIS FINALS NEWPORT BEACH, CA – April 1977 SOUTH AFRICA VS. USA

The Davis Cup is played by national teams and by continent. Africa never allowed South Africa to play representing Africa, because of its racism in choice of athletes. In fact, no black player could ever qualify for the team, given lack of any equipment or courts for them. South Africa then played as “European” country, until anti-apartheid organizing (mainly Dennis Brutus) had them ousted. The USA then had the Davis Cup authorities rule that South Africa could play as a South American country.

The matches begin by countries from one continent playing each other (like soccer). The winner of those matches then plays winners from other continents. In 1977, South Africa was the winner for the South American continent and was scheduled to play the USA as winner of the North American continent.

Many groups in Southern California came together to organize protest outside the tennis stadium. Busses were even arranged to transport groups from all over the LA basin. The demo occurred but policy surveillance was heavy and the demonstrators could not get very close to the stadium.

Secretly, unknown to all the protest organizers for they knew the group was infiltrated, two decided to obtain tickets to the match (not easy to do) and to run on the court and pour oil on it, to delay the match. When they did this act of civil disobedience about an hour into the match, the coach of the US team, Tony Trabert, picked up a metal racket and started whacking at the two. The ferocity of Trabert was apparent to all the television viewers.

The demonstration and non-violent disobedience were a major success in educating many about apartheid. South Africa was eventually ousted from the Davis Cup.

LOS ANGELES SUMMER OLYMPICS – 1984

The All Africa Olympics Committee set up reception centers at the Olympic villages at USC and UCLA to provide anti-apartheid materials (e.g. Apartheid Sport – Change but No Improvement in this file). They also had a presence to make sure that no apartheid propaganda was available to the villages. Bud Day at UCLA and Carol Thompson at USC were contact points for Rich Lapchick and Sam Ramsamy as representatives for the AAOC.

Zola Budd, a white long-distance runner from South Africa, obtained UK citizenship in a few weeks, in order to enter the Olympics, as “English,” but South Africans and Zola all saw this as simply a citizenship of convenience. SASC and SARP in LA worked with the All Africa Olympic Committee (via ACCESS with Rich Lapchick and SANROC with Dennis Brutus) with the goals (all achieved) of 1) no apartheid propaganda in the Olympic villages; 2) opposing any apartheid propaganda in the press; 3) restrictions on apartheid press and coaches across the Olympic events ; and 4) delay of telecast of the Games to South Africa for 24 hours. They were achieved because all of Africa was totally behind them. The local organizers just facilitated work on the ground.

In Spring 1984, Thompson obtained funding from USC to teach a course on the Politics of the Olympics, which included issues like racism in sports, inequality of women athletes, as well as government policies; she used the funds to invite speakers, such as Harry Edwards (fist raised on winners’ podium in Mexican Olympics-1968) and Anita deFrank, first female VP of US Olympic Committee to speak. During that semester, a FBI agent showed up in Thompson’s university office, giving her business card marked FBI. She asked Thompson if she could name (paraphrasing), “white South Africans living in Beverly Hills, but working in the US defense industries and violating their visa statuses.” Thompson suggested that the agent inquire of immigration, not her, if visa violations were incurred. The agent replied that US Immigration had not been helpful. She also said (paraphrasing), “can you please help us with finding xx black South Africans?” At that point, Thompson stood up and said, “you can leave right now.” Everyone on the local anti-apartheid Olympic organizing committee saw the incident as the FBI simply informing them they were being watched.

The organizing was totally successful in that athletes received materials about apartheid and South Africans only saw Zola Budd trip Mary Decker after a 24-hour delay.

SOUTHERN AFRICA RESOURCE PROJECT Los Angeles, CA 1981-1991

SARP was formed by Bud Day and Carol Thompson in response to the need for dissemination of materials about Southern Africa in the Los Angeles area.

Providing Resources to Southern California

It was a resource project and therefore, only staged events in coalition with other anti-apartheid organizations in Los Angeles. SARP supplied all of them with 1) campaign materials from national offices, 2) press clips, 3) lists of films and books available, 4) media contact lists and 5) locally written analyses. Members of SARP tabled at innumerable activist events, including those for Central America, and wrote many letters to the editors of local newspapers about Southern African issues. SARP worked with independent book stores to stock progressive books on Southern Africa.

Press Clips to Southern Africa

From the experience of Bud and Carol, living in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 1977-1980, those in the Frontline States had little information about anti-apartheid activities across the US or various components of US foreign policy. From 1981-1984, SARP collected and copied various information materials to send to comrades in Southern Africa, mainly Mozambique, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. In exchange, SARP received information from NGOs and others, especially Mozambique Information Agency (AIM).

On Tour to Los Angeles

Comrades from liberation groups and liberation support groups would often put L.A. on their national tour agendas. This file contains only a very few but gives an idea of how important the visitors were in educating L.A. and how extensive the organizing was to host them. For example, Acquino de Bragança was hosted by SARP and SASC before his death in President Machel’s airplane crash. Graça Machel was also hosted by the two.

SARP and SASC hosted 6-10 per year, which usually required the following: 1) finding funds for speaking honoraria 2) booking the visitor to speak at meetings, rallies and on the media 3) media coverage of events 4) reception of visitor, including transport around the L.A. basin and room/board.



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA – LOS ANGELES 1980s from failure to success to failure

USC is a private university and during the 1980s, several members from its Board of Trustees were part of Reagan’s “kitchen cabinet.” They fully supported “constructive engagement.” Student organizing for USC divestment from apartheid occurred during the whole decade of the 1980s.

Olympics - Summer 1984 – Zola Budd, a white long-distance runner from South Africa, obtained UK citizenship in a few weeks, in order to enter the Olympics, as “English,” but South Africans and Zola all saw this as simply a citizenship of convenience. (See LA Olympics file) USC was an Olympic village for athletes (along with UCLA). SASC and SARP in LA worked with the All Africa Olympic Committee (via ACCESS with Rich Lapchick and SANROC with Dennis Brutus) with the goals (all achieved) of 1) no apartheid propaganda in the Olympic villages; 2) opposing any apartheid propaganda in the press; 3) restrictions on apartheid press and coaches across the Olympic events ; and 4) delay of telecast of the Games to South Africa for 24 hours. They were achieved because all of Africa was totally behind them. The local organizers just facilitated work on the ground.

In Spring 1984, Thompson obtained funding from USC to teach a course on the Politics of the Olympics, which included issues like racism in sports, inequality of women athletes, as well as government policies; she used the funds to invite speakers, such as Harry Edwards (fist raised on winners’ podium in Mexican Olympics-1968) and Anita deFrank, first female VP of US Olympic Committee to speak. Thompson was also active in the above local organizing. During that semester, a FBI agent showed up in Thompson’s university office, giving her business card marked FBI. She asked Thompson if she could name (paraphrasing), “white South Africans living in Beverly Hills, but working in the US defense industries and violating their visa statuses.” Thompson suggested that the agent inquire of immigration, not her, if visa violations were incurred. The agent replied that US Immigration had not been helpful. She also said (paraphrasing), “can you please help us with finding xx black South Africans?” At that point, Thompson stood up and said, “you can leave right now.” Everyone on the local anti-apartheid Olympic organizing committee saw the incident as the FBI simply informing them they were being watched.

In April 1986, Reagan bombed Tripoli, Libya – calling the city a “terrorist base;” President Qaddafi’s young daughter and other civilians were killed, no Libyan military. The Frontline States (Angola, Botswana, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe) were outraged because they saw it as a green light to apartheid to do the same. In fact, in

July 1986, apartheid commando raiders bombed Gaborone, Botswana; Harare, Zimbabwe and Lusaka, Zambia. (Pictures in Concerned Americans in Zimbabwe file)

Concerned Americans in Zimbabwe (see that file) immediately organized in April, after the Libyan bombing. Other members had spoken at other rallies and meetings, so this time, Carol Thompson was chosen by the group to speak a solidarity message at a demonstration in front of the US Embassy against the Reagan bombing of civilians in a city. This file contains extensive correspondence and documentation that the US Information Agency (USIA) wrote President Zumberge of USC with an inflamed denouncement of Thompson. They accused Thompson of 1) organizing the demonstration; 2) inciting the crowd to burn the American flag; 3) working with the Russians, Libyans, Iranians; 4) interfering with the internal affairs of the Zimbabwean government and 5) making it impossible for the US Embassy to function.

This file also contains letters of support for Thompson. Because the only allegation that could be taken seriously was “interfering with the internal affairs” of Zimbabwe, Thompson obtained letters of support from two cabinet ministers, stating the opposite. Returning to the USA after 2.5 years in Zimbabwe (1984 to June1986), Thompson met with USC authorities who stated that they were taking no formal actions against her but still reprimanded her. Thompson knew that “confidential” information was being passed between the US government and USC and obtained a full Freedom of Information (FOA) file with such correspondence. She also asked the African Studies Association (ASA) and the American Political Science Association (APSA) for condemnation of such an attack on freedom of speech. She received strong letters of support (enclosed) from both organizations. The Association of American University Professors (AAUP) also took up her defense and published a full disclosure of the lies and misrepresentations about her (article enclosed).

Under the Reagan Administration, there were many attacks on freedom of expression by scholars and artists, especially if one were from Central American or Southern African liberation groups. This file simply documents how this was done, against one US scholar.

1988 - With divestment was still a distant dream, Professors Herbert Short and Carol Thompson appealed to a special USC presidential fund (still President Zumberge) for organizing a “theme semester” on Southern Africa for the Fall 1989. He gave about $8000 to pay for the advertising, for special speakers and to stage plays. Both Shore and Thompson viewed this as “guilt money” to counter calls for divestment. But the money was used to educate!

During fall term 1989, the following activities occurred (called the “South” African Semester for obvious reasons, but all activities referred to the entire region): 1) 18 courses offered in 13 departments – all focused on Southern Africa

2) visit and presentations by Mozambican artist, Malangatana Ngwenya He also taught art classes to children in South Central LA 3) world premier of Athol Fugard’s “Deep Ground” by USC students 4) presentation of “Born in the RSA” play by USC students. 5) anti-apartheid poster exhibit for weeks – hung all around the USC bookstore 6) poster drawing contest in LA high schools – anti-apartheid posters 7) singing and dancing presentations by Themba and Vukani Mwethu—South African dance groups based in California

See the white spiral “Administrative/Faculty Manuel” which was produced to instruct and advertise how to conduct a theme semester across US universities. Money for the project came from the presidential fund but Dean C.S. Whitaker confiscated the funds and would not release them, even after appeals came from other deans, organized by Shore and Thompson, The two saw this as USC closing down any continuing education efforts about apartheid, limiting the effort to one semester on one campus.

About 2000 students participated in various aspects of the South Africa Semester. USC never divested.

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA – LOS ANGELES (UCLA)

Various groups involved in organizing on campus:

African Studies Center Black Student Union Committee for Health in Southern Africa- CHISA (UCLA has a prominent School of Public Health) UCLA Concerned Faculty

The major goal of divestment was attained by the whole University of California system divesting in 1986.

CHURCHES – SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 1980-1994

Bud Day was an ordained Presbyterian minister and therefore, he was often invited to speak at churches and to assist with their organizing on Southern Africa.

CONCERNED AMERICANS IN TANZANIA 1978-80

The idea of “concerned Americans” was not only to make statements within a particular country, but also, to facilitate the information flow between Southern Africa and the USA. Writing and sending information were key activities—to inform the liberation support movement in the USA as well as information about anti-apartheid activities back to the liberation forces (all of them were in Dar), especially because the press in the USA most often distorted information, or covered it not at all. We also organized among ourselves to receive US comrades who could not afford expensive hotels and hosted them (Ted Lockwood, George Houser, Gloria Waite, Jen Davis, Rich Lapchick and many more).

This group was most involved in the issue of the liberation of Zimbabwe, for many US officials were in/out of Dar es Salaam to try to convince Mwalimu (President Julius Nyerere) to accept many deals which were short of one person-one vote. The “Anglo-American Proposals” were one such package. Andrew Young was sent by the US government in shuttle diplomacy with Tanzania, after 1976 when Henry Kissinger unsuccessfully tried to enshrine white supremacy.

A first action came as a direct request from Mwalimu (early 1978) to Martha Honey, a journalist in Dar, along with her husband, Tony Avirgan. President Nyerere had agreed to receive a group of US businessmen on their way back to the US after visiting apartheid South Africa. He wanted detailed information about each of the corporations they represented. Martha asked Bud Day (who was visiting and not working) to help her. Together they compiled an impressive dossier of how CocaCola, Ford, GM and others supported apartheid, complete with data on dollar amounts. When the businessmen arrived, the Daily News newspaper carried articles about their complicity. When they met with Nyerere, he lectured them about their duplicity in financing apartheid while appearing to support freedom. He gave them their statistics. Martha was warmly thanked by Mwalimu for helping him score a diplomatic victory, showing the Americans that indeed, the Frontline knew what was going on.

March 1978 – Opposition to the “internal settlement” of Rhodesia. Petition given to US ambassador to Tanzania.

October 1978 – Postering the US Embassy Ian Smith was invited to the US in direct violation of UN sanctions against Rhodesia. Martha Honey, Tony Avirgan (journalists), Jean Pruitt (Maryknoll Sister), Bud Day and Carol Thompson (Unviersity of Dar es Salaam) quietly organized to paste a poster on the US Embassy door. Jean was the artist who made the poster. Tony was the photographer who could get the picture to international wire services. So Carol and Bud were chosen to pose. The embassy was in an office building (not the current fortress). At 6 am, Marines came out (of course surveillance cameras) as we approached. Jean calmly said, “we are just wanting to put up a poster; please go back in and let us finish.” They did! We put up the poster and Tony snapped the picture. It did go out over several international wire services, from IPS to APS to the Soviets’.

CONCERNED AMERICANS IN HARARE, ZIMBABWE

The idea of “concerned Americans” was not only to make statements within a particular country, but also, to facilitate the information flow between Southern Africa and the USA. Writing and sending information were key activities—to inform the liberation support movement in the USA as well as information on about anti-apartheid activities back to the liberation forces and the Frontline States (Angola, Botswana, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe).

1983 – Concerned Americans was started by the Ann and Bob Seidman and Ted Lockwood over the US invasion of Grenada.

1985 and 1986 Commando raids by apartheid South Africa into Zimbabwe on a regular basis, the atrocities of RENAMO, and the continuing US support of apartheid made expressions of opposition even more important.

1987 and 1988 Carole Collins and Steve Askin continued the tradition but no documentation is here.

1992 and 1993 The focus was on Angolan elections and US recognition of Angola

COALITION FOR THE LIBERATION OF SOUTHERN AFRICA 1976-1977

This meeting was organized by the national offices to facilitate communication and coordination among local liberation support groups. In a sense, this meeting was the beginning of these archives!

SOUTHERN AFRICA EDUCATIONAL CAMPAIGN 1992-1994

Organizing for this campaign was initiated by NGOs in Harare, Zimbabwe who were concerned that the needs of Southern Africa would disappear from the American agenda after free elections in South Africa. Many of the themes chosen for the campaign reflected the legacy of apartheid in the region: from refugees to development in agriculture and water.

Begun in 1992, the organizing took over two years, with communication problems between the groups in Washington, DC and Harare, Zimbabwe, as well as the usual funding problems. But it happened!



MERCENARIES

Wow, who would have guessed! In the 1970s, being a mercenary was the most despicable job one could take.

From 2004, mercenaries make up about one-third of the forces in Iraq and are honored by the title, “private security.” Let’s go back to advance to the future.

ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENCE – April 15, 1980 A joyous time - Bud Day was in Harare a few weeks before April 15, 1980. Perhaps this file can be used to document one success story of independence.

[THESE FILES MAY BE MERGED WITH OTHERS FROM THOSE AREAS] CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

Bud Day was Peace Education Secretary, AFSC, in Chicago, 1976-1977 and in Pasadena, CA, 1977-1978.

EAST LANSING, MI 1970-1976

LOVEMORE NYONI

The personal plight of Lovemore was central to the formation of SALC. In trying to assist him personally, SALC was formed to address, analyze, and expose the political and economic reasons behind the personal problems.

This case is a good example of linking the personal to the global, the personal to the structural.

JOHN P. MCGOFF

John P. McGoff owned many local, small newspapers, especially in the Midwest USA. When he wanted his editorial printed in all his newspapers, he would send them on a special color paper, and each editor was required to print it. Apartheid South Africa found him useful for putting their propaganda into local newspapers, to tell their story across “middle America.” McGoff also tried to buy the Washington (DC) Star, but by that time, his links to apartheid became known. His links to apartheid were a part of “Mulder-gate” (Minister of Information Mulder), the apartheid government using secret funds to pay private individuals for support of apartheid.

SALC members were convinced that McGoff, through his strong influence in the Michigan conference of the Methodist Church, was instrumental in getting Bud Day fired from United Ministries in Higher Education (UMHE) in 1975.

Processing Information

Inventory created by Peter Limb and Candace Gifty Boahene.
Title
Finding Aid for the Carol B. Thompson and Bud Day papers on Southern Africa
Status
Cataloged
Author
Finding aid by Peter Limb and Candace Gifty Boahene.
Description rules
aacr

Repository Details

Part of the Michigan State University Libraries Special Collections Repository

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